Emdalstindane from Ryr
Emdalstindane
 
     

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Estimated net time 4-5 hours
Difficulty This route is not recommended when it's wet. The route up to 1400m is generally steep without any difficulties, but on wet rock you should be careful on a section of slab above where you cross the stream at 670m.
When you get up below the summit ridge you enter partially steep scrambling territory if you head up to the ridge, and if you don't find a good route it can get a little nasty because of slippery moss. It is probably better to traverse left (south) below the scrambling section and then head up to the summit a little south of the summit, but this is likely to require the snow to have melted.
Drinking water Several sources of running water in the lower half of the route.
GSM coverage Coverage in the lower half of the route (June 2014).
Parking Room for several cars around trail head.
Start height 420 metres
Vertical metres 1050 metres for the roundtrip.
Trip distance 5.2 km
GPS-file X
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Route photo

  Overview of route to Emdalstindane from Ryr.
  Upper part of route to Emdalstindane.

 

From the 3-way junction on road 60 above (west of) Stranda centre, where road 60 goes towards Sykkylven, Stranda centre and Hellesylt, drive 14.8 km towards Hellesylt and Stryn. Park on the left hand side of the road, at Ryr, where there are a couple of houses.

Start your hike by crossing road 60, walk less than 100 metres west and cross the foot bridge across the river, and continue past the lake on the right (north) side. Head up the open area towards the right (northern) of the two streams coming down, and continue uphill on the left hand side of this stream. Cross the stream at 670m and find your best route across the section of slab. When you get up to a cliff band you can pass it with some easy scrambling on the right hand side, and then continue uphill through grass and heather. The terrain is steep but offers relatively easy walking, although strenuous. When you get higher up stay close to the right hand side of the stream and then gradually turn left (south) when you get above 1300m.

When you get to approximately 1400m, at the foot of the much steeper terrain, you have two options. If the snow has melted it's probably best to traverse below the steep section, towards left (south), and then ascend the summit where the terrain gets a little less steep slightly south of the summit. Alternatively, and probably the best route if there's still snow below the summit ridge, is to scramble up to the ridge a little left (south) of a vertical section along the ridge itself. Once on the ridge turn left and it's relatively easy walking across to the unmarked summit.

Descend by reversing your ascent route.

 

 

28. June 2014

I had been very keen on getting Emdalstindane "bagged" for a couple of years and when I got an opportunity this nice Saturday I couldn't resist the temptation. But in hindsight I should have waited another couple of weeks because of the snow below the steep section in the east side. This snow forced me to scramble up the upper section of the east slopes, which was a little challenging but done in OK style. But I got into serious problems when descending, since I didn't took the time to ensure I found my ascent route, and at one point I got stuck. Seriously stuck. I had jumped from a slanting section of moss onto a ledge, but wasn't able to get up from the ledge in any comfortable way. And jumping back to the moss was totally out of the question. I tried several routes, and spent approximately 40 minutes covering a section that I should have done in a couple of minutes if I had been able to traverse further down (where there was still uncomfortable snow), or maybe five minutes if I had scrambled down my ascent route. I was a little prepared for some challenging scrambling and had brought a couple of slings, but I didn't find any suitable place to attach them, so they were no use. After the failed attempt with the slings I was getting quite desperate, and this got even worse when I realised there was no GPS coverage. Hence I was only left with one option; compose myself and scramble up the very uncomfortable and exposed section I had already tried a couple of times. This worked out OK, just, and I was extremely relieved when I got down to safer territory.

Apart from my nasty experience when descending the upper part of the hike this is a first class route, with steep terrain and good views from the summit. Might well be repeated!

Photos 28.06.2014